ISCA CHAIRMAN GUEST AT WHITE HOUSE RAMADAN IFTAR

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 12, 2004

 

In the Name of God, the Beneficent, the Merciful

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Accompanied by Secretary of State Colin Powell, Energy Secretary Spence Abraham, National Security Advisor Condoleeza Rice, Chief of Staff Andy Card and Special Assistant, Elliot Abrams, President George W. Bush was in a warm and joyful mood Wednesday night at his annual Ramadan dinner at the White House.

 

In his remarks President Bush said, "Ramadan is also a time for togetherness and thanksgiving. As Muslims gather to break the fast, there is so much to be thankful for. I know you're thankful for your families and communities, and we all pray for their safety and happiness in the year ahead.... In recent years, Americans of many faiths have come to learn more about our Muslim brothers and sisters. And the more we learn, the more we find that our commitments are broadly shared. As Americans, we all share a commitment to family -- to protect and to love our children. We share a belief in God's justice, and man's moral responsibility. We share the same hope for a future of peace. We have so much in common, and so much to learn from one another."

 

ISCA Chairman Shaykh Muhammad Hisham Kabbani commenting after the iftar said, "It was an intimate gathering, and we are pleased that our president continues to demonstrate sincere respect for Islam." He added, "With his second term about to begin, the president has taken pains to show the world that the US is not engaged in a war against Islam."

 

Other guests include Muslim ambassadors from around the world, several Muslim academics of the DC area, policy analysts such as Shireen Hunter and Hedieh Mirahmadi, as well as the leader of the American Bosnian community, Imam Senad Agic.

 

ISCA thanks the president and the White House for honoring them in the holy month of Ramadan. The president's Iftar dinner at the White House follows more than sixty such dinners at U.S. embassies around the world, seeking to promote understanding between Muslims and non-Muslims.